Gallery 743 in the American WIng displays a broad selection of objects by Louis C. Tiffany
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Luminous Treasures: Inspired by the Art of Louis C. Tiffany

Our range of distinctive Met Store products evokes the work of one of America's pre-eminent masters of the decorative arts

Born in New York City on February 18, 1848, Louis Comfort Tiffany lived an extraordinary life—and left a rich artistic legacy. From his magnificent stained-glass windows in American churches to his coveted lamps and Favrile glass vases that garner millions today at auction, the work of the Gilded Age master continues to resonate with art lovers everywhere. His prodigious output is well represented in the Museum’s American Wing, where The Met Store team finds endless inspiration. 

The Deedee Wigmore Gallery at The Met is dedicated to the Aesthetic movement, the Arts and Crafts movement, and the art of Louis C. Tiffany (pictured at top). Here, visitors can admire a host of singular items from Tiffany Studios: lamps, leaded-glass windows, Favrile vessels, ceramics, mosaics, furniture, jewelry, and more.

On view in this gallery is an elegant Favrile vase with a peacock feather pattern, one of Louis C. Tiffany’s favorite motifs from nature. Made about 1900, this gleaming piece lends its iridescence to our sleek pen and handsome glass paperweight. The lustrous feather design also graces our sophisticated shawl—a Met Store best seller, season after season.

Vase. Designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848–1933). Made by Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company (American, 1892–1902). Favrile glass, ca. 1900. Gift of Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, 1951 51.121.2

Some of our newest items celebrate Garden Landscape, the magnificent mosaic and fountain display (shown below) installed in the Museum’s light-filled Charles Engelhard Court. Its shimmering palette was achieved by juxtaposing tiny glass tiles of slightly varying hues.

Garden Landscape. Designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848–1933) Made by Tiffany Studios (1902–32). Favrile glass mosaic, ca. 1905–15. Gift of Lillian Nassau, 1976 1976.105

Our Garden Landscape product selections include the eye-catching items shown below.

For a touch of art at the table, consider our attractive porcelain mugs, which are decorated with a detail from Hibiscus and Parrots, a beautiful stained-glass window produced about 1910–20. Its glowing mottled glass gives the impression of sunlight filtered through the foliage, revealing the designer’s brilliant use of color and texture.

Hibiscus and Parrots. Designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848–1933). Made by Tiffany Studios (1902–32). Leaded Favrile glass, ca. 1910–20. Gift of Earl and Lucille Sydnor, 1990 1990.315

Our fun iron-on patch and gleaming enamel pin borrow the form of a whimsical dragonfly that perches on an ethereal hair ornament of silver, enamel, and gemstones. This delicate 1904 creation is acknowledged to be one of the most important examples of the designer’s jewelry. It showcases his reverence for nature in its expressive form of two dragonflies resting on dandelion seed balls.

Hair Ornament. Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848–1933). Gold, silver, platinum, black opals, boulder opals, demantoid garnets, rubies, enamel, ca. 1904. Gift of Linden Havemeyer Wise, in memory of Louisine W. Havemeyer, 2002 2002.620

Our handsome cuff features the famous Pine Needle pattern from a metal and Favrile glass frame produced about 1905–20. This frame was sold with a matching inkwell and other desk items, examples of the “fancy goods” that were priced for middle-class consumers. The pristine example on which we have based our chic bracelet descended in the family of Tiffany Studios’ last bookkeeper and was never used.

Frame. Designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848–1933). Made by Tiffany Studios (1902–32). Gilt bronze, Favrile glass, ca. 1905–20. Gift of Estate of John F. Scharffenberger, 1990 1990.314.8

Shop these items and many more at The Met Store here.

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