From left: Imperial Caucasus Egg (1893), Imperial Napoleonic Egg (1912), Danish Palaces Egg (1890). House of Carl Fabergé. Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation (L.2011.66.53a–c)
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A Parade of Easter Art

However you celebrate Easter Sunday, these works from The Met collection are sure to get you in a festive mood

Happy Easter from The Met Store! Whether you’re getting ready to celebrate this joyous holiday at church, at the Easter parade, or over some dyed eggs and chocolate bunnies, we have a few images to lift your spirits.

He Is Risen

After the austerity of Lent, Christians around the world are singing “Hallelujah!” today, as they celebrate the resurrection of Jesus.

The Resurrection. Perugino (Italian, active by 1469–1523). Tempera on wood, 10 5/8 x 18 in. Frederick C. Hewitt Fund, 1911 (11.65)

 

A Miraculous Day

As told in the gospels, when two women who visit His tomb discover that his body is no present, an angel appears and conveys to them with the news of the resurrection, per Mark. In the Matthew, Jesus himself appears to the shocked women.

Manuscript Illumination with Scenes of Easter in an Initial A, from an Antiphonary. Nerius (Italian, active 1310–1325). Tempera, ink, and gold on parchment; 9 7/16 x 9 3/8 in. overall; ca. 1320. Rogers Fund, 1912 (12.56.1)

 

Hare Extension

Meanwhile, secular celebrants enjoy the arrival of the Easter bunny. This character may derive from rituals related an ancient pagan goddess of fertility, Eostre, whose symbol was the rabbit.

Happy Easter (Frohe Ostern). Urban Janke (Austrian, 1887–1914), published by the Wiener Werkstätte. Color lithograph, 5 1/2 × 3 9/16 in., Museum Accession, transferred from the Library (WW.145)

 

To Dye For

Dying eggs—in spring-worthy pastels, Art Nouveau patterns, or however you like your colors—is another beloved Easter tradition.

Easter cards. Josef Hoffmann (Austrian, 1870–1956), published by the Wiener Werkstätte. Color lithographs, 5 1/4 x 3 1/4 in. each, 1910 (left) & 1908. Museum Accession, transferred from the Library (WW.5 [left] & WW.6)

 

Basket of Adorables

Children around the word enjoy candy, dyed eggs, and other treats left in their holiday baskets. (Luckily, the tradition of giving live chicks on Easter Sunday has gone by the wayside.)

Top: Family of rabbits dancing around a large Easter egg, from the Easter Subjects series (E45) issued by the American Caramel Company to promote Easter Caramels. Commercial color lithograph, 1910. The Jefferson R. Burdick Collection, Gift of Jefferson R. Burdick (Burdick 314, E45.7). Bottom: Rabbit pushing wheelbarrow of Easter eggs and chicks, from the Easter Subjects series (E45) issued by the American Caramel Company to promote Easter Caramels. Commercial color lithograph, 1910. The Jefferson R. Burdick Collection, Gift of Jefferson R. Burdick (Burdick 314, E45.11)

 

Crowning Glory

Strolling around town in a towering chapeau is another Easter Sunday tradition. Happy parading.

Easter Sunday in Harlem. Henri Cartier-Bresson (French, 1908–2004). Gelatin silver print, 19 5/16 x 12 15/16 in., 1950s. Gift of Photography in the Fine Arts, 1959 (59.559.15)

 

And today and every day, shop The Met Store for gifts inspired by art and jubilant color.

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